Thursday, 29 June 2017

Another illustration of how net metering works

Here's another example from one of our solar arrays of how net metering works. On June 28, 2017, this array composed of 23 modules on a 2200 square foot house produced a credit of 15 kWh. In other words, it sent 15 kWh of electricity into the grid and the smart meter recorded that surplus generation.


There are some features of this graph worth noting. First, between Midnight and 7AM the house pulled electricity (consumed) from the grid. By 8AM the house's solar array began producing more electricity than the house used and it continued to do so until 6PM. Second, the magnitude of the bars going down (credit) peaked at solar Noon, and the distribution of energy production follows a normal curve shape on a sunny and clear day - assuming that electricity consumption in the house is constant.

This array has already generated a surplus of 136 kWh for the month of June that will roll into July. A surplus in July will roll to August, and so on. With net metering, and a large enough solar array relative to consumption, you can create a substantial credit to reduce your winter billing. This is why solar works well and also why batteries are not required.


Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Solar Is An Excellent Investment

If you're a resident of British Columbia, you've probably noticed that your BC Hydro bills have increased in recent years. Since 2010, residential rates for electricity have increased a whopping 50% for an average annual increase of 7.14%.


With your own solar array, you can take back the power and control future rate increases.

Here's a typical example of a solar array that Sweet Spot Solar can do for you:

* 28 solar modules rated at 305 Watts each will build an 8.54 kW DC array that should produce on average 10,191 kWh/year under ideal conditions on an annualized, multi-year basis assuming a roof pitch of at least 23 degrees [in the interior of BC].

* Sweet Spot Solar's average price for the equipment is around the $20,000 mark (all-in with delivery), and one of our recommended installers can often commission such an array for $6000.

Assuming an installation cost of $6000.00, your array from us will cost $3.03/Watt. This is more than 30% below the British Columbia average.


* Your array is an excellent investment that will generate a return on investment of 5.6%/year. The payback time for the array is 12 years, and over 25 years it will save a total of $91,992.00 on energy bills for a profit of $66,092.00 (savings-installed cost).

To arrange your own quote, contact us at info@sweetspotsolar.com


Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Take that BC Hydro

Solar saves you money! This 2200 square foot house in BC has a solar array composed of 18 modules. During the month of May it used only 39 kWh from the grid, and its total bill from February to June is $186. The owners will likely not purchase electricity until October or November but by then a rolling credit of surplus production can be drawn upon. This is the beauty of net metering.
This house does not have access to natural gas and heats with electric mini-split heat pumps and uses electricity for hot water. It also charges an electric car!


Saturday, 3 June 2017

Arctic Energy and Emerging Technologies Conference and Tradeshow

Sweet Spot Solar's CEO Michael is a speaker at the Arctic Energy and Emerging Technologies Conference and Tradeshow in Inuvik NWT being held between June 12 and 14. The title of his talk is "Solar power: Energy, community capacity building, and sustainability." To learn more, click here.